Regenerative agroforestry for sustainable cotton production and land restoration in Chad

Living Labs

Regenerative agroforestry for sustainable cotton production and land restoration in Chad

This Living Lab aims to restore degraded land and improve the livelihoods of local populations through sustainable agroforestry cotton farming approaches in Logone Occidental and Lac Provinces.

Project launch: November 2022
Location: Logone Occidental and Lac provinces, Chad
Objectives: Restoring degraded land, improving biodiversity, water management, soil health, rural livelihoods and tackling social exclusion
Key activities: Establish cotton agroforestry / Training and capacity building / Establish tree nursery / Provide technical assistance to cotton farmers
Main species planted: Acacia Nilotica, Khaya Senegalensis, Faidherbia Albida, Balanites aegyptica, Zizuphus mauritiana
Partners: International Rescue Committee, Reforest´Action, European Forest Institute, LVMH, Pretaterra, local government and research organizations

Why?

Cotton is the main cash crop produced in the western provinces of Chad, and more than 4 million Chadians rely on cotton production for their livelihoods. However, the high-water requirements of cotton, climate change, current farming practices and the lack of finance and training for farmers are crucial limitations for the crop’s long-term sustainability. Lake Chad has shrunk by 90% from 1963 to 2001, and at current rates could disappear in 20 years’ time. The drying of the lake has led to a decline in cotton production capacity in the region, leading to internal migration and increasing strain on the environment.

Following recent reforms, the government aims to achieve production of more than 900,000 tons of cotton per year, positioning Chad among the top African cotton producing countries. The key question is how to achieve this sustainably while reversing the degradation of Lake Chad, the surrounding land and biodiversity. This Living Lab aims to address these challenges while creating economic opportunities for the local population linked to sustainable cotton value chains.

What?

  • Action on the ground
    This Living Lab aims to restore degraded land and improve the livelihoods of local populations through sustainable agroforestry cotton farming approaches in Logone Occidental and Lac Provinces.
  • Establishing cotton agroforestry demo sites
    In collaboration with local farmers and partners, the Living Lab will co-design and establish cotton agroforestry demonstration plots to showcase the multiple benefits of regenerative agroforestry for sustainable cotton production.
  • Training local farmers
    The Living Lab will provide training on regenerative agroforestry for the 500 farmers already organized in associations. We will train lead farmers, who can then give practical demonstrations for local farmers. This will include techniques like pruning and management of trees, seedling production, crop protection and effective water management.
  • Supporting access to technology
    The Living Lab will support access to technologies like planting or harvesting equipment, storage or sustainable irrigation technologies that reduce workload and save time for farmers (especially for women and young people), as well as increasing production capacities.
  • Establishing community tree nurseries
    The Living Lab will establish community tree nurseries to produce high quality tree seedlings to local farmers. The community nursery will be managed by groups of 10 to 12 people (50% women) trained in nursery and tree growing techniques.
  • Restoring degraded land
    We will implement a portfolio of restoration strategies, that are tailored to local needs and local conditions to restore the degraded lands surrounding Lake Chad.

Expected impacts

The project directly contributes to the achievement of 11 of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, which provide a roadmap to a better and more sustainable future.

Our latest Chad stories

Eminent scientists join new CBA Scientific Advisory Board

Five scientists have joined the newly established Circular Bioeconomy Alliance Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), to provide scientific advice on CBA principles, strategic plans and activities.

Bart Muys has been appointed as the first Chair of the SAB for 2022-2025. Bart is a Professor of Forest Ecology and Management at KU Leuven (Belgium). His research focuses on the role of tree diversity for forest ecosystem functioning under climate change, on restoration ecology of dry forests, and on sustainability evaluation of forests and bioenergy systems. He is supervisor of 47 graduated and 15 ongoing PhDs. Several of the papers he co-authored have been highly cited, and in 2021 he featured in Reuters’ hot list of most influential climate scientists.

Nathalie Seddon is Professor of Biodiversity and Founding Director of the Nature-based Solutions Initiative in the Department of Biology at the University of Oxford, and Director of the Agile Initiative and co-lead of the Biodiversity and Society Programme at the Oxford Martin School. She is also founding non-executive Director of the Oxford University Social Venture, Nature-based Insetting. 

José J. Campos Arce is the executive director of the Sustainable Agriculture Network, a global collaborative network that works towards transforming agriculture. He has 35 years of experience in international cooperation, technical, academic and scientific organizations and NGOs, working in international development, science and education. José is the former director general of CATIE, and former Co-Chair of the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee of CIFOR.

Demel Teketay Fanta is Professor in Forest Sciences and Dean of the Faculty of Natural Resources at Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources. His research focuses on diversity, stand structure, dynamics and restoration of vegetation in the different forest types, as well as sustainable/responsible forest management, the role of fire in the regeneration of plant species, and invasive plant species.

Sonya Dewi is the ICRAF country programme coordinator of Indonesia and is a Senior Landscape Ecologist. During more than twenty years of professional career as a researcher, she has focused on the understanding of the trade-offs and integration between conservation and development agendas at the landscape level across different contexts, and on identifying options to change the trajectories in several countries, such as Indonesia, India and Brazil.

Image: Adobe.stock.com – Leigh Prather

CBA welcomes new member

LVMH has joined the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance as a member, becoming part of a global movement powered by nature and people.

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance (CBA) was established by King Charles III in his former role as The Prince of Wales in 2020.

The CBA is an action-oriented partnership that connects the dots between investors, companies, governmental and non-governmental organizations and local communities to advance the circular bioeconomy on the ground while restoring biodiversity globally. Activities include its global network of Living Labs for Nature, People and Planet which use landscape restoration projects as the starting point to catalyse the development of circular bioeconomy value chains while restoring biodiversity and local livelihoods.

LVMH provides support for the CBA’s Living Lab in Chad which focuses on sustainable cotton production via regenerative agroforestry and land restoration, working with farmers to plant fruit or timber trees alongside their cotton crops. The project was launched on 7 November 2022.

More information

The Alliance is facilitated by a Secretariat hosted by the European Forest Institute. For more information please contact:

Yitagesu Tekle, CBA Coordinator (firstname.lastname @ efi.int)

Image: malp/stock.adobe.com

CBA and LVMH announce major new project

In the context of COP27, the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance and LVMH announce a major new project tackling one of the serious challenges the African continent is facing.

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance (CBA), established in 2020 by His Majesty King Charles III, when he was the Prince of Wales, gathering institutional and business actors is developing sustainable cotton production in Africa in a regenerative agroforestry system, which is part of the Great Green Wall project.

In addition to local government and research organizations, this collaboration brings together an exceptional diversity of partners with experience in multiple areas. By participating in this project, the world’s leading luxury group, LVMH, takes a further step in line with its environmental program, LIFE360, and its commitments to regenerative agriculture. This joint effort also includes the International Rescue Committee (IRC), Reforest’Action, European Forest Institute and Pretaterra.

In a region particularly subject to difficult climatic conditions, Lake Chad has shrunk by 90% from 1963 to 2001, and at the current rate of recession could disappear about 20 years from now. Industrial water-intensive cotton production is one of the drivers for this loss.

To address this, the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance’s unique Living Lab in Chad puts forward new sustainable and regenerative methods of cotton production while restoring biodiversity and creating economic opportunities for the local population linked to sustainable cotton value chains. Thanks to the support of LVMH, the Living Lab will be able to focus on regenerative agroforestry and land restoration, working with 500 cotton farmers to plant fruit or timber trees alongside their cotton crops.

Introducing diverse trees into cotton farms helps with soil fertility and water retention, increases biodiversity, and also helps boost income for local farmers. For example, fruit trees like mango and ber can provide both food for the farmer’s personal consumption or be sold in local markets. Some tree species fix nitrogen, providing soil fertilization as well as fodder for livestock. Tall tree species can provide a protective forest cover and reduce evapotranspiration, reducing water requirements.

Working with the local community, the Living Lab will establish community tree nurseries to grow quality planting materials. It also supports access to planting and harvesting equipment, product storage, and sustainable irrigation technologies. At the other end of the process, the Living Lab also aims to improve existing cotton value chains, as well as creating markets for complementary crops like cassava, maize and pepper.

This is a very special project for the CBA as we  demonstrate how the need to decarbonise economic sectors like the fashion industry can act as a catalyst to restore degraded landscapes – turning them into regenerative ones while providing jobs, prosperity and hope to Africa. The climate-poverty-land degradation crisis affecting Africa requires holistic approaches, connecting regenerative landscapes to sustainable markets,” said Circular Bioeconomy Alliance Chair Marc Palahí.

Through its LIFE 360 environmental strategy, LVMH has committed to making the protection of biodiversity and fighting climate change an absolute priority, and to being an exemplary actor of change. LVMH has set the target to implement regenerative agriculture in all strategic supply chains and to preserve 5 million of hectares by 2030. Already supporting regenerative cotton production in Turkey, LVMH is proud to support its new project in Chad to preserve local biodiversity, fight climate change and desertification,” said Hélène Valade, LVMH Environmental Development Director.

A core component of the global work of the IRC is to develop innovative, scalable and resilient solutions with local communities most impacted by the growing climate crisis. We are delighted to be doing just that in Chad in partnership with the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance – working together to restore biodiversity, heal degraded soil and strengthen local livelihoods through sustainable and resilient farming solutions. The IRC has seen first-hand the growing toll of climate change across Africa – and the significance of innovative programs like this one for the millions already living with the consequences,” said David Miliband, International Rescue Committee President and CEO.

More information

Download the press release as a pdf

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance was established in 2020 by His Majesty King Charles III (when he was the Prince of Wales). It provides knowledge-informed support as well as a learning and networking platform to connect the dots between investors, companies, governmental and non-governmental organizations and local communities to advance the circular bioeconomy while restoring biodiversity globally. The European Forest Institute hosts the Secretariat of the Alliance.

Contact: Yitagesu Tekle Tegegne, CBA Coordinator (yitagesu.tekle @ efi.int)
 

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton is represented in Wines and Spirits by a portfolio of brands that includes Moët & Chandon, Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Krug, Ruinart, Mercier, Château d’Yquem, Domaine du Clos des Lambrays, Château Cheval Blanc, Colgin Cellars, Hennessy, Glenmorangie, Ardbeg, Belvedere, Woodinville, Volcán de Mi Tierra, Chandon, Cloudy Bay, Terrazas de los Andes, Cheval des Andes, Cape Mentelle, Newton, Bodega Numanthia, Ao Yun, Château d’Esclans, Château Galoupet and Joseph Phelps. Its Fashion and Leather Goods division includes Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior, Celine, Loewe, Kenzo, Givenchy, Fendi, Emilio Pucci, Marc Jacobs, Berluti, Loro Piana, RIMOWA, Patou. LVMH is present in the Perfumes and Cosmetics sector with Parfums Christian Dior, Guerlain, Parfums Givenchy, Kenzo Parfums, Perfumes Loewe, Benefit Cosmetics, Make Up For Ever, Acqua di Parma, Fresh, Fenty Beauty by Rihanna, Maison Francis Kurkdjian and Officine Universelle Buly. LVMH’s Watches and Jewelry division comprises Bulgari, Tiffany & Co., TAG Heuer, Chaumet, Zenith, Fred and Hublot. LVMH is also active in selective retailing as well as in other activities through DFS, Sephora, Le Bon Marché, La Samaritaine, Groupe Les Echos, Cova, Le Jardin d’Acclimatation, Royal Van Lent, Belmond and Cheval Blanc hotels.

www.lvmh.com

CBA at royal climate event

Circular Bioeconomy Alliance Chair Marc Palahí will participate in a reception at Buckingham Palace today, hosted by King Charles III ahead of the COP27 Climate Change Conference.

The event will bring together over 200 international business leaders, decision makers and NGOs from across a variety of sectors to discuss climate change and the progress made since COP26. Also attending will be US climate envoy, John Kerry and Alok Sharma, president of the COP26 conference.

Marc said: “This is a great honour for the CBA and EFI to participate in such a high-level event to discuss how forests and the bioeconomy can help to tackle climate change”.

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance was founded by King Charles III in 2020, while still the Prince of Wales. It provides on-the-ground examples of how investing in land restoration can catalyse the development of nature-positive and climate-neutral value chains to decarbonise the economy while supporting local communities.

The CBA will participate in COP27, for example its Living Lab in the Himalayas will be highlighted at the Terra Carta Action Forum event on regenerative fashion on 7 November.

Image: BillionPhotos.com/stock.adobe.com

Building a shared vision in the Sacred Headwaters region of the Amazon

The Sacred Headwaters region in the Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazon is considered one of the most biodiverse areas in the world. It measures 35 million hectares and is home to 600,000 people from more than 30 indigenous nationalities.

In spring 2022, the CBA and Lombard Odier joined the Amazon Sacred Headwaters Initiative on a journey in the region to build a shared vision amongst indigenous peoples, global organisations, governments, philanthropists and investors in protecting the region, tackling industrial scale resource extraction and living in harmony with nature.

Read reflections from Marc Palahí, Chair of the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance on his trip to Ecuador

Living Laboratory will be be developed by the indigenous communities with the support of CBA member, Fundación Pachamama and our Living Lab coordinating organization, Reforest´Action. It aims to accelerate landscape restoration in Ecuador and Peru, while creating new forest-based value chains around cocoa, vanilla, medicinal plants and even eco-tourism, financing regenerative landscapes while preserving ancient traditions. The CBA will also support a new school for young indigenous leaders, to build new capacities to scale up restoration work and bio-based business models.

Restoring land through agroforestry in Rwanda

Living Labs

Restoring land through agroforestry in Rwanda

Implementing agroforestry with a regional African dimension

The mountains of East Africa are home to millions of people, and a range of ecosystem services and goods that are an important source of future agrobiodiversity. They play a central role in water supply and associated poverty alleviation and sustainable development. However, climate change is already drastically affecting this area, with the last glaciers in Africa disappearing by the middle of this century. This leads to increased pressure on land, erratic rainfall patterns, as well as deadly floods and droughts.

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance is partnering with national and international organizations to create a Transboundary Regional Living Lab to enhance the resilience and adaptation of all mountain ecosystems and their communities in East Africa. This Living Lab in West Rwanda is the first phase of this ambitious initiative.

Project launch: 2022
Location: Mukura Forest and Lake Kivu catchment, Rwanda
Objectives: Restoring and conserving forest cover, slowing degradation of ecosystems, promoting sustainable value chains
Key activities: Restoring degraded lands with agroforestry / Mobilising and empowering community groups / Planting 3.6 million trees / Developing livelihoods through sustainable agriculture and land management practices
Main species planted: Grevillea robusta, Markhamia lutea, Alnus acuminata, Prunus Africana, Mytragina, Avocado, Coffee, Tea
Partners: Local communities, Local government, ARCOS, Reforest’Action

Why?

Rwanda’s forest cover has decreased by 8.2 % since 2000. In the mountainous landscapes of Rutsiro District, land and forest degradation have brought major environmental and socio-economic problems. High population pressures lead to the fragmentation of arable land and provoke a high dependence on agriculture and forest resources. Intense deforestation, mainly driven by unsustainable agricultural practices and population growth has led to soil erosion, land degradation and landslide risks, a threat exacerbated by climate change.

To tackle this issue, the government initiated a national vision that puts the environment and natural resources at the centre of its development. The CBA’s Living Lab based on agroforestry directly contributes to this strategy. By combining landscape and circular bioeconomy value chain approaches as well as integrating traditional and latest scientific knowledge, the Living Lab will help enhance environmental resilience, restore the soil’s ecological functions as well as increase crop productivity and enhance local livelihoods.

What?

  • Action on the ground
    This Living Lab takes place around the Mukura Forest and the Lake Kivu catchment in Rwanda. The project will target over 30,000 households and cover a total area of 15,000 hectares. Local stakeholders will plant various tree species in agroforestry systems to restore the biodiversity of degraded ecosystems. This will also support timber productivity, carbon sequestration as well as soil and water conservation. Sustainable livelihood options will also be created through nature-based value chains, via the sustainable production of timber, coffee, tea, and fruits.
  • Restoring land through agroforestry
    Agroforestry is based on the introduction of trees on farms and in the agricultural landscape. The introduction of agroforestry practices increases crop productivity while improving the resilience of the degraded ecosystems. Integrating indigenous species in agroforestry helps to restore biodiversity in agricultural lands and reduce soil erosion. It also contributes to the local population’s food security and to the diversification of the income generated by crops.
  • Fostering collective action
    A network of over 1,000 community groups will be mobilised and empowered through the Living Lab. The trees planted and the forest goods produced as well as the commercialisation of coffee and tea will contribute to develop the livelihoods of up to 120,000 people. A network of cooperatives will be created, together with 31 nature-based community funds to ensure the financial sustainability of the work carried out. This approach will improve local producers’ access to established community groups and help them enhance and diversify their income.

Expected impacts

The project directly contributes to the achievement of 11 of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, which provide a roadmap to a better and more sustainable future.

Circular Bioeconomy Alliance welcomes 5 new members

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance is pleased to announce that five new organisations have joined its work to place nature and people at the heart of a global circular bioeconomy.

The new members include: Albertine Rift Conservation Society (ARCOS Network), International Rescue Committee, Lifescaped, Pachamama, United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO).

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance (CBA) was established by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales in 2020. The CBA is an action-oriented partnership that connects the dots between investors, companies, governmental and non-governmental organizations and local communities to advance the circular bioeconomy on the ground while restoring biodiversity globally.

The CBA’s activities include its global network of Living Labs for Nature, People and Planet which use landscape restoration projects as the starting point to catalyse the development of circular bioeconomy value chains while restoring biodiversity and local livelihoods.

The diversity of new members reflects the nature of the Alliance, which includes large and small intergovernmental organizations, companies, investors, research organizations and NGOs, who provide expertise and implement projects in areas related to the circular bioeconomy.

More information

The Alliance is facilitated by a Secretariat hosted by the European Forest Institute. For more information please contact:

Yitagesu Tekle, CBA Coordinator (firstname.lastname @ efi.int)

Image: Deemerwha studio / AdobeStock.com

HRH The Prince of Wales launches restoration of forest landscapes in Romania

  • HRH The Prince of Wales launches restoration of forest landscapes in Romania by his Circular Bioeconomy Alliance
  • Europe’s largest cross border forest restoration project launched
  • New science-policy study on forest biodiversity published

Leading scientists, experts and practitioners met in Sibiu, Romania on 30 May to launch Europe’s largest cross border forest restoration project. The ThinkForest science-policy event celebrated a growing movement to restore forest biodiversity and advance the circular bioeconomy, for the benefit of people and the planet.

The event was opened by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, who the same day launched a landscape restoration project in the Carpathian mountains, funded by his Circular Bioeconomy Alliance and developed in collaboration with the Horizon 2020 project SUPERB.

The Romanian Minister of Environment, Waters and Forests Barna Tánczos joined HRH for the opening of the event.

His Royal Highness emphasised in his opening speech that we have to rethink our economy if we want to rewrite our future. We need a circular bioeconomy, investing in three mutually reinforcing areas: biodiversity, innovation and local and indigenous communities. The rest of the world can learn from the way Romania has relied on regenerative approaches to create rich landscapes in areas such as Transylvania, where man lives in harmony with nature.

The ThinkForest event also marked the launch of the 20m euro Horizon 2020 project, SUPERB, coordinated by the European Forest Institute. The project involves more than 100 forest science and practice organizations in 20 different countries and includes 12 large-scale forest restoration demonstration sites across Europe. One of the sites is located in the Romanian Carpathian mountains.

Marc Palahí, European Forest Institute Director and chair of the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance said: “Scientific collaboration is crucial to scale up successfully forest restoration in Europe in a context of rapid environmental changes and increasing demands on our forests. I am proud of EFI´s leadership in bringing together some of the leading scientists and practitioners in Europe to demonstrate why and how we can restore forest landscapes for different purposes and benefits.”

A new EFI science-policy study on Forest Biodiversity in Europe was also presented at the event. Written by a group of distinguished scientists from 10 European countries, the study provides policymakers as well as forest and landscape managers with a better understanding of the complex subject of biodiversity in the context of European forests.

More information

ThinkForest is a European high-level discussion and information-sharing forum on the future of forests. ThinkForest is facilitated by the European Forest Institute, an independent, science-based international organization. More information: https://www.efi.int

SUPERB ‘Systemic solutions for upscaling of urgent ecosystem restoration for forest-related biodiversity and ecosystem services’ is a four-year, 20 million euro, EU-funded Horizon 2020 project, with 36 project partners and over 90 associate project partners. More information: https://efi.int/projects/superb-systemic-solutions-upscaling-urgent-ecosystem-restoration-forest-related 

The Circular Bioeconomy Alliance was established by His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales in 2020. It provides knowledge-informed support as well as a learning and networking platform to connect the dots between investors, companies, governmental and non-governmental organizations and local communities to advance the circular bioeconomy while restoring biodiversity globally.

Read the full text of HRH The Prince of Wales speech

For more information: Rach Colling, Head of Communications, European Forest Institute,

A new economy powered by life: a circular bioeconomy

Chair of the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance Marc Palahí reflects on the opportunities offered by the circular bioeconomy

The multidimensional and mutually accelerating crises that are converging today – climate, biodiversity and health – are the consequences of the same fundamental problem: our economic system. It is a system addicted to fossil resources and to growth at all costs, that has failed to value our most important capital and the basis for human health and wellbeing: Nature.

Now we have arrived at a tipping point characterized by the unparalleled alteration of our biosphere, upon which humanity depends. We need to rethink our economy if we want to rewrite our future on time.

We fundamentally need a new economy, where life – remember that bio- means life! – and not consumption becomes its true engine and purpose. A new economy that prospers in harmony with nature but at the same time is powered by nature. This is not a contradiction but a necessary condition to create a circular bioeconomy. Because above all a circular bioeconomy is about reconnecting humanity, nature and the environment as a basis for a sustainable future.

A circular bioeconomy is about restoring and sustainably managing our biological systems to produce in a synergistic way food, energy, ecosystem services and biobased solutions to decarbonize our economy while generating jobs and prosperity. Doing this also requires us to recognize and invest in biodiversity as its true engine. Biodiversity is a prerequisite for life to adapt and evolve in a changing environment – and a bioeconomy is an economy that ultimately relies on life and its diversity.

The circular bioeconomy is also an opportunity to holistically rethink our land, food and energy systems while simultaneously transforming key industrial sectors and their value chains to become circular and carbon neutral. The beauty of biological resources is that, if managed wisely and sustainably, they are renewable and circular by nature. This is why biobased solutions are key to decarbonize our economy and make it circular.

Forests are central in transitioning to a circular bioeconomy. Not only because they are our main biological infrastructure, our largest terrestrial carbon sink and main host for biodiversity, but also because they are the main source of non-food non-feed biological resources. With emerging science knowledge and new technologies these resources can be transformed into a new range of wood and non-wood based solutions that can replace and environmentally outperform fossil products in sectors like construction, textiles, chemicals, transport or packaging.

For instance we can now produce a new generation of sustainable low carbon textile fibres with a carbon footprint six times lower than polyester, without generating the problem of microplastics because they are biodegradable. We can also produce a new generation of wood engineering products to replace steel and concrete at scale – two materials whose production is responsible for more than 12% of the carbon emissions globally. Using wood in building construction not only reduces the carbon footprint of our cities compared to using concrete and steel but it can also transform cities into a carbon storage infrastructure. Every cubic metre of wood products we use in our buildings stores a ton of CO2.

Over the last few decades Europe has invested substantially in forest science, technology and innovation and industrial forest-based sector development. This explains why the European Union, which hosts 4% of the world forests, is responsible for more than 40% of the global forest products export value. In comparison, Brazil hosts 12% of the world forests but is only responsible for about 4% of the global export value. Africa as a continent harvests 54% more wood than the EU, but the export value of the products made is 17 times less than that of the EU: 6 billion dollars versus 100 billion dollars. This is because 90% of the wood harvested in Africa is used for low efficient energy. This demonstrates the great potential for transcontinental collaboration to increase the climate mitigation impact of the wood-based solutions we are generating, while also increasing the economic value and jobs attached to them. At the Circular Bioeconomy Alliance we are demonstrating on the ground how restoring landscapes, investing in biodiversity and innovation can create new value chains that economically and environmentally outperform fossil-based value chains.

Over the next two decades we need to put forward the greatest economic transformation in human history, due to the scale and speed of change required to achieve a climate-neutral, inclusive and nature positive economy. This is an unprecedented global challenge but it is also the greatest opportunity to rethink our economy and create a better world for future generations.

Forests and the forest-based circular bioeconomy are crucial to catalyse the radical change that the world needs. Unlocking their potential requires working together across disciplines and sectors to develop transformative insetting strategies rather than focusing on offsetting tactics.

Further reading

Palahí, et al. 2020. Investing in Nature as the true engine of our economy: A 10-point Action Plan for a Circular Bioeconomy of Wellbeing. Knowledge to Action 02, European Forest Institute. https://doi.org/10.36333/k2a02

Hetemäki, L., Palahí, M. and Nasi, R. 2020. Seeing the wood in the forests. Knowledge to Action 1, European Forest Institute. https://doi.org/10.36333/k2a01

Image: billionphotos.com/AdobeStock